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Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

2 edition of Nesting and foraging ecology of band-tailed pigeons in western Oregon found in the catalog.

Nesting and foraging ecology of band-tailed pigeons in western Oregon

Jerome Patrick Leonard

Nesting and foraging ecology of band-tailed pigeons in western Oregon

by Jerome Patrick Leonard

  • 129 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Pigeons -- Behavior -- Oregon.,
  • Pigeons -- Oregon -- Nests.,
  • Pigeons -- Oregon -- Habitat.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Jerome P. Leonard.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination95 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages95
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15496076M

    Band-tailed Pigeon: Large dove, small, purple-gray head and broad neck with distinctive, thin white band on nape. Back and wings are purple-gray, underparts grade from purple-gray neck and breast to white belly. Tail is pale gray, dark band at base. Bill, legs,feet are yellow. Swift direct flight. Breeding and Nesting. Band-tailed Pigeon: Lays one or two white eggs in a flimsy platform nest made of sticks and twigs, lined with pine needles, and built in a tree. Incubation ranges from 18 to 20 days and is carried out by both parents. Young fledge 25 to 27 days later; may have two or three broods each year. Foraging and Feeding.

    Improved knowledge of movements of the Interior population of Band-tailed Pigeons (Patagioenas fasciata) is needed to inform management decisions. We investigated daily and seasonal movements of adult Bandtailed Pigeons marked with satellite transmitters in – Band-tailed Pigeons were marked at 3 geographically separate locations in Silver City, Weed, and Los Alamos, New Mexico, .   Learn to Identify Birds in Oregon! Make bird watching in Oregon even more enjoyable! With Stan Tekiela’s famous field guide, bird identification is simple and informative. There’s no need to look through dozens of photos of birds that don’t live in your area. This book features species of Oregon birds, organized by color for ease of s:

      Estimate of Trichomonasgallinae-induced mortalityinband-tailedpigeons, Leonard, J. P. (). Nesting and foraging ecology of band-tailed pigeons upper Carmel Valley, California, winter – The Wilson Journal of in western Oregon. Ph.D. Dissertation, Oregon State University, Ornithology ,– doi/ Corvallis, OR. Few birds have been associated with humans so closely as the Rock Pigeon, better known as the common city pigeon. It has been domesticated and taken around the world, raised for food, trained for homing, racing, and carrying messages, and used in research. Originally native from Europe to North Africa and India, it now lives in a wild or semi-wild condition in cities all over the world.


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Nesting and foraging ecology of band-tailed pigeons in western Oregon by Jerome Patrick Leonard Download PDF EPUB FB2

Nesting and foraging ecology of band-tailed pigeons in western Oregon Public Deposited. I radio-marked adult band-tailed pigeons in the central Oregon Coast Range in April-May of to document nesting chronology and productivity, and characterize nesting and feeding habitats. I radio-marked\ud adult band-tailed pigeons in the central Oregon Coast Range in April-May of \ud to document nesting chronology and productivity, and characterize nesting and feeding\ud habitats.

One-hundred and thirty-seven nests initiated by 65 different birds were\ud monitored. Radiotelemetry Location of Nesting Band-Tailed Pigeons in Colorado. The Wilson Bulletin Kautz, E and CE Braun. Survival and recovery rates of band-tailed pigeons in Colorado.

The Journal of Wildlife Management Leonard, JP. Nesting and foraging ecology of band-tailed pigeons in western Oregon.

A backwoods relative of the ubiquitous Rock Pigeon, the Band-tailed Pigeon is common in forests of the Pacific Coast and the Southwest. A sociable bird with a mellow coo, it forms large flocks in mountain forests where it feeds on seeds and fruits.

As flocks pass overhead, these large, swift-flying pigeons can resemble Rock Pigeons, so look for the long tail with a wide, pale band at the tip. Both parents feed the young pigeon milk, a protein- and fat-rich liquid produced in their crops.

The young stay in the nest for about 4 weeks and are tended by their parents for some time after leaving the nest. In warm climates, Band-tailed Pigeons may raise broods per year.

This big pigeon, larger than the familiar park pigeon, is common in parts of the west. It lives along much of the Pacific Coast and in the mountains, moving about nomadically to feed on acorns, berries, or other wild food crops.

Band-tails are sociable, foraging in flocks at most seasons and often nesting in small colonies. Unlike many doves, they do much of their feeding up in trees.

Nesting and Foraging Ecology of Band-tailed Pigeons in Western Oregon by Jerome P. Leonard A DISSERTATION submitted to Oregon State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Presented Febru Commencement June The Rock pigeon is an invasive species introduced from Europe.

It is found in and about human-created structures, e.g., masonry buildings, parking structures, barns, abandoned houses, bridges, water towers and freeway overpasses that posses cornices, ledges, and cave-like cavities used for nesting. 1 Introduction The band-tailed pigeon (Columba fasciata, herafter BTPI) is a game bird that inhabits mixed conifer-oak forests in western North America and Central and South America.

Eight subspecies of BTPI are recognized; however, only two occur north of Mexico (Pacific Flyway ). inside lining of the crop of both g band - tailed pigeons are sparsely scattered, but congregate to feed, drink, and consume supplemental minerals and during migration.

Comprehensive material on the life history of the band-tailed pigeon may be found in Keppie and Braun (), Braun (), Jarvis and Passmore (), and Neff (). Kids’ Guide to Oregon Birds. Watching birds is a lot of fun – you can do it anywhere.

From your backyard, in your neighborhood, around town and beyond, birds are all around us. Click on the images below to find photos and information to help you identify birds you’re likely to. Therefore, we created snags by topping live trees with a mechanical harvester and studied foraging and nesting use by cavity-nesting birds of these snags in clearcuts in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga mensezii) forests along the west slope of the Cascade Mountain Range and east slope of the Coast Range in Oregon, USA.

We used a completely randomized. "The Outlook for Conserving the Band-tailed Pigeon as a Game Bird of California." The Condor 15 (1): - Keppie, Daniel M, and Clait E Braun. "Band-tailed Pigeon (Columba Fasciata)." The Birds of North America (): - Leonard, Jerome Patrick. "Nesting and Foraging Ecology of Band-tailed Pigeons in Western Oregon.".

Cavity-Nesting Birds and Small Woodlands Fran Cafferata Coe, Cafferata Consulting, Hillsboro, Oregon A publication by the Woodland Fish and Wildlife Group, Funded in Part by the Oregon Forest Resources Institute.

Publications by the Woodland Fish and Wildlife Group are intended for use by small woodland owners across the Pacific Northwest. The ecology of band-tailed pigeons (Columba fasciata) was investigated in western Oregon to assess the roles of survival and recruitment to population status and the relation of food, minerals.

Leonard, Jerome Patrick. Nesting and foraging ecology of band-tailed pigeons in western Oregon. Corvallis, OR: Oregon State University. American wildlife and plants. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc. [] Naether, Carl.

78% of the time. This allowed for raising 3 broods in a day nesting season. Nesting habitat is another key component in favorable band-tailed pigeon habitat.

Western Oregon birds were found to prefer closed-canopy, conifer forests with trees that are inch dbh or years old (Leonard, ). Mineral springs are critical to band-tail pigeons because they provide mineral salts such as calcium needed for egg.

Mineral sites are probably the most critical foraging habitats for Band-tailed Pigeons as they are used regularly (in British Columbia once every 7–15 days, A. Breault pers. comm.) but are in very limited supply (e.g., 1/3, km2 in western Oregon, Sanders and Jarvis ).

Explore the latest full-text research PDFs, articles, conference papers, preprints and more on AQUATIC ECOLOGY. Find methods information, sources, references or conduct a literature review on. Robert JarvisLatin name: Patagioenas fasciataThere is no formal population survey specifically designed to index population abundance of band-tailed pigeons throughout their range.

Data from the Breeding Bird Survey (BBS), Washington and Oregon Mineral-Site (WAORMS) surveys, and Washington Call Count (WACC) survey offer evidence of long-term population decline. stands. Band-tailed pigeons may return to the same nest site every summer and construct new nests in that stand.

In another Oregon study, most nesting occurred within 16 miles of mineral springs and mineral-laden waters. Mineral springs are described and discussed in the next section.

Food Habits and Foraging. Hard mast (nuts) is readily con. A backwoods relative of the ubiquitous Rock Pigeon, the Band-tailed Pigeon is common in forests of the Pacific Coast and the Southwest.

A sociable bird with a mellow coo, it forms large flocks in mountain forests where it feeds on seeds and fruits. As flocks pass overhead, these large, swift-flying pigeons can resemble Rock Pigeons, so look for the long tail with a wide, pale band at the tip.The band-tailed pigeon (Patagioenas fasciata) is a medium-sized bird of the closest relatives are the Chilean pigeon and the ring-tailed pigeon, which form a clade of Patagioenas with a terminal tail band and iridescent plumage on their necks.

There are at least 8 sub-species, and some authorities split this species into the northern band-tailed pigeon (Patagioenas fasciata) and.